Team Fastrax Skydive Causes UFO Sightings in Columbus, Ohio

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Wednesday, July 10th 2013
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A pyrotechnic display over Scioto Downs on July 6th, 2013 has caused UFO sightings around Columbus, Ohio. Team Fastrax performed their skydive at 9:45pm, a time when many people were still looking up at fireworks in the sky, and the seemingly unexplainable lights caused a social media UFO frenzy.

Columbus, Ohio (PRWEB) July 10, 2013

After the completion of the races at Scioto Downs on July 6th, Team Fastrax performed their famous night pyrotechnics show. They exited the plane around 9:45pm at 12,500 ft. The team members were in freefall for about 25-30 seconds followed by 5 minutes of canopy flying. Shortly after, videos and tweets about UFO sightings in Columbus started popping up. Official photos from the race and skydive can be seen on the Scotio Downs Facebook Page.

As reported by 10TV, on 07/07/2013, the show caused reports of strange lights to pop up all over Franklin, Pickaway, and surrounding counties. One of the suggested UFO videos, can be seen on YouTube Here. In it, you can hear speculation on what the lights could be, including a suggestion that men were flying around on jet packs.

John Hart, owner of Start Skydiving, and member of Team Fastrax, said, “The pyrotechnics show is one of our most exciting performances, and we always cause UFO sightings. It is an amazing site to behold, whether up-close or far away, so I can see where these reports come from. The funny thing is, people still don’t believe us when we take credit for their sightings.”

This isn’t the first time they’ve caused a stir. In 2009, UFO sightings broke out all over Cincinnati due to their skydive into the UC homecoming football game, as seen on YouTube Here. And more recently, on 10/16/2012 FOX 19 reported on several sightings around their own dropzone in Middletown. According to Fox 19, Reports of UFO sightings in Middletown had picked up in pace. There was a heavy response on Twitter and even calls into the FOX19 newsroom of UFO sightings in Middletown. The latest report came in on that Monday, of an alleged sighting of at least 23 orange lights in the sky, according to some Twitter users.

Bud Prenatt, Captain of Team Fastrax, said this about the sightings, “Team Fastrax performs night time pyrotechnic demonstration skydives all around the world about 50 times every year. We are based out of Start Skydiving in Middletown, Ohio, which explains the frequent sightings over Ohio. These displays have been reported to be seen from over 50 miles away.”

According to Team Fastrax’s website, the Night Pyro Show is their most requested show. It consists of four TSA fireworks-licensed Team Fastrax demonstrators. They typically exit the aircraft at 5,000 to 4,500 feet above the ground. Pyro is ignited under canopy all the way to 500 feet then the demonstrators land in the target area. Fastrax also performs the flaming meteorite from 12,500 feet; spectators will see a flaming fireball for 20 seconds as the demonstrators fall 4,000 feet with the Pyro ignited, creating a fire trail more than 1,000 feet long, before breaking apart into four separate flight patterns, creating a starburst effect. Once under canopy, the demonstrators will ignite Pyro creating 100’ trails of fire until 500 feet. This show normally lasts 15 minutes.

Team Fastrax is sponsored by Selection.com, a leading provider of criminal background checks and pre-employment screening services. They are the most ambitious professional skydiving team in the world. The team has a roster of more than twenty-nine active members, with a culmination of more than 300,000 skydives. Team Fastrax has performed exhibition skydives all over the world for audiences large and small as a patriotic display or as a product promotion.

For questions or for an interview, contact John Hart II with Team Fastrax at jhart(at))teamfastrax(dot)org 513-484-3680.

The Twitter photo is an actual snapshot taken from Twitter on 07/09/2013.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/7/prweb10913049.htm